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Listen to Marvin's Room April. 28, from Drake to Diana Ross
By
Amanda Parris

Published

April 28, 2017

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Marvin's Room is the home of R&B on CBC. The show airs Friday 7:00 p.m on Radio 2, Sunday 8:00 p.m on Radio 1, Wednesday at 4:00 a.m and Friday at 3:00 p.m on SiriusXM.

Listen To The Show On Demand

Amanda Parris is the host of the new CBC Radio 2 show Marvin's Room.
Listen to Marvin's Room, April 28th 2017

Marvin's Room with Amanda Parris on CBC Radio

Audio

In this episode, I’ve got a string of new Canadian tunes I can’t wait for you to jam to. You’ll hear singers from Berlin and across the pond in the UK. You’ll also dabble in the blues of the ‘50’s and the glam melodrama of the ‘70’s. I hope you’re ready for this R&B journey.

The Playlist

Drake f/ Black Coffee and Jorja Smith – Get it Together
Robin S - Show Me Love
Kaytranada f/ Syd - You’re the One
Shay Lia - Blue
Will - Palisades
Ray Charles - Night Time is the Right Time
Mary J. Blige - I’m Going Down
Bibi Bourelly and Earl St. Clair - Perfect
Majid Jordan - King City
Jhene Aiko - The Worst
Maxwell - Pretty Wings
Diana Ross - Touch Me in the Morning

Ray Charles - Night Time is the Right Time

Ray Charles is a household name…and for good reason. He’s the man credited with creating soul music and his songs stand the test of time. But there’s another person whose voice helped to define some of Ray’s biggest hits and her name is not one that most people know.

Margie Hendrix was the leader of the Raelettes, the group of women who were the backing singers that helped to amplify the sound of the one many called “The Genius.” You can hear her iconic voice on songs like “Tell the Truth,” “What I Say,” and “Hit the Road Jack.” Theirs was a collaboration for the music history books.

But unfortunately music wasn’t the only thing they ended up collaborating on. There’s a running joke in the industry that the name the Raelettes was inspired by the fact that any singer who joined the backing singers had to “let Ray” in and Margie was no exception. Their affair led to the birth of a son which was messy enough (since Ray was a married man), but add drug addiction to the mix and you’ve got a looming disaster on the horizon.

After a massive argument one day Ray fired Margie from the Raelettes. Margie released a few solo singles in the years following but at the age of 38 she died suddenly from what many believe to be a drug overdose.

Right now, let’s celebrate the musical magic that was created at one moment in time between Brother Ray and Margie Hendrix.

Majid Jordan - King City

A lot of Toronto R&B is made to be the perfect soundtrack while driving and this song is another one to add to the collection. I recommend listening to it while cruising on a highway, the window down, the lights of the city skyline twinkling in your rear-view mirror. Majid Jordan do angsty electro-R&B at it’s best.

Maxwell - Pretty Wings

In the late 90’s an R&B singer with perfect bone structure, a curly afro and distinctly long sideburns captured the hearts of listeners around the world. His name was Maxwell and he was one of the leaders in the new sound dubbed neo-soul. His song “Fortunate” topped the charts and he was a constant presence at award shows

But soon after Maxwell decided to take a break from performing and recording. For years there was no word on the soulful singer. Then, over a decade after his release of “Fortunate,” he made his grand return. The afro and sideburns were replaced with a sophisticated low cut. The flared jeans were exchanged for perfectly fitted three piece suits, but the voice hadn’t forgotten how to find its way right back into the hearts of his listeners.

The song “Pretty Wings” was his return anthem and in the years since it’s cemented its place as a classic in the R&B canon.

Diana Ross - Touch Me in the Morning

When Diana Ross finally decided to leave The Supremes, she hit the ground the running.
For the next 3 years, Diana was on a grind-mode that could have Beyonce second-guessing her work ethic.

From 1970-1973, Diana Ross released 5 solo albums, she starred in her first solo television special, played Billie Holiday in the film Lady Sings the Blues, received a golden globe and Oscar nomination for her performance, released the soundtrack to that movie, and a duet album with Marvin Gaye. Diana was not playing around.

In the midst of all of this, she was also in the last throws of one of the most legendary romances in the R&B history books The love affair between Diana Ross and Motown head honcho Berry Gordy has inspired musicals and movies and led to the birth of their daughter. But 2 months into her pregnancy, Diana decided to end it once and for all and marry music executive Robert Ellis Silberstein. Can you imagine if Twitter was around when this drama was going on?

It was around this time that Diana released the song “Touch Me in the Morning,” an enduring anthem about the difficulty of saying goodbye. Rumour has it that Diana struggled recording it, calling it one of her most vocally challenging songs and she suffered near emotional breakdowns trying to make it. She definitely tapped into something special because it became a number 1 hit and is one of my all-time favourites.

The Marvin's Room R&B Stream

Explore the world of R&B, 24 hours a day 7 days a week with our new "Marvin's Room R&B" stream. Inspired by the studio where Marvin Gaye recorded much of his legendary music and by the more recent Drake song of the same name, Marvin's Room brings back the old school and introduces what's going on. Hear: Patti LaBelle, Party Next Door, Toni Braxton, Alicia Keys, Destiny's Child, Prince, Deborah Cox.

Explore the world of R&B from neo-soul to trap soul and everything in between. Inspired by the studio where Marvin Gaye recorded much of his legendary music and by the more recent Drake song of the same name, Marvin's Room brings back the old school and introduces what's going on. Hear: Patti LaBelle, Party Next Door, Toni Braxton, Alicia Keys, Destiny's Child, Prince, Usher, Deborah Cox